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Reviews Views Date of last review
1 9049 Wed January 9, 2008
Recommended By Average Price Average Rating
No recommendations None indicated None indicated
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Description: Feeding guideline:
A 25kg dog should be fed about 300 g


Ingredients
Lamb Meal, Rice, Wheat Flour, Corn, Poultry Meal, Wheat Shorts, Wheat, Poultry Fat, Protein-Hydrolysate, Cellulose, Sodium, Potassium Chloride, Chicory Powder, Yeast, Glucosamine, Chondroitin Sulfate.


Typical Analysis
Crude Protein 23.9%
Crude Fat 12.6%
Crude Fibre 2.2%
Moisture 8.0%
Crude Ash 7.8%
Calcium 1.40%
Phosphorous 1.10%
Potassium 0.60%
Sodium 0.39%
Magnesium 0.12%


Vitamins
Vit. A 15000 iu/kg
Vit D3 1200 iu/kg
Vit E (Alpha-Tocopherolacetat) 150 iu/kg
Copper (as copper-II-sulfate, pentahydrate) 10 iu/kg
Metabolizable Energy 15.5 MJ/kg
Omega 3 0.36%
Omega 6 2.40%
Ratio Omega 6/Omega 3 6.7:1


Expected contents of other vitamins and trace elements (not guaranteed)
Vit. B1 12 mg/kg
Vit. B2 12 mg/kg
Vit. B6 7 mg/kg
Vit. B12 100 mcg/kg
Biotin 500 mcg/kg
Pantothenic Acid 30 mg/kg
Nicotenic Acid 50 mg/kg
Folic Acid 3 mg/kg
Vit. K 1 mg/kg
Vit. C 70 mg/kg
Choline Chloride 2.0 mg/kg
Iron 145 mg/kg
Zinc 170 mg/kg
Manganese 25 mg/kg
Cobalt 0.4 mg/kg
Iodine 3 mg/kg
Selenium 0.4 mg/kg


Additives
Vitamin A 15000 IU/kg
Vitamin D3 1200 IU/kg
Vitamin E (Alpha-Tocopherolacetat) 150 IU/kg
Copper (as copper-II-sulfate, pentahydrate) 10 IU/kg


With Antioxidants (extracts of tocopherols of natural origin, propyl gallate)



Editors

Registered: October 2005
Posts: 3953
Review Date: Wed January 9, 2008 Would you recommend the product? No | Price you paid?: Not Indicated | Rating: 0 

 
Pros: First ingredient is a named meat product
Cons: Insufficient meat content, meat and fat products of unidentifiable origin, controversial filler

The first ingredient in the food is a named meat meal. There is a second meat ingredient fifth on the ingredient list, but this is not identified by species. "Poultry" could be any fowl and may also vary by source. Unidentified ingredients like this are usually cheap and of very low quality. We prefer not to see them used in dog foods. The fat ingredient is similarly of low quality and unidentifiable source. Protein hydrolysate (usually from whey) is a low quality means of boosting the protein content of the food.


The next ingredients are grains - six of them - making this appear a very grain heavy food, with very little meat content likely. Rice is a decent quality grain, but the use of corn and wheat are less desirable. Corn is of limited value, being a difficult to digest grain that is also commonly implicated in food allergies. Wheat is believed by many to be the number one cause of food allergy problems in dogs. As wheat shorts this consists of "fine particles of wheat bran, wheat germ, wheat flour, and the offal from the “tail of the mill”. This product must be obtained in the usual process of commercial milling and must contain not more than 7% crude fiber". In simpler terms, the floor sweepings from processing of wheat for flour and other products. Wheat flour (in dog food commonly a byproduct of human food production) is a further grain fragment we consider primarily filler. Cellulose is “purified, mechanically disintegrated cellulose prepared by processing alpha cellulose obtained as a pulp from fibrous plant materials”: otherwise known as sawdust.


Beet pulp is controversial filler which appears to be used in large quantities in this food. It is a by-product, being dried residue from sugar beets which has been cleaned and extracted in the process of manufacturing sugar. It is a controversial ingredient in dog food, claimed by some manufacturers to be a good source of fibre, and derided by others as an ingredient added to slow down the transition of rancid animal fats and causing stress to kidney and liver in the process. We note that beet pulp is an ingredient that commonly causes problems for dogs, including allergies and ear infections, and prefer not to see it used in dog food. There are less controversial products around if additional fibre is required.


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